Saturday, June 20, 2009

Dog Care












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Dog Behavior Training To Housebreak Your Puppy

Are you ready to find the puppy housebreaking solutions you have been searching for? I'm glad you found my article. Sit back and relax and I believe you will learn a thing or two.

Housebreaking is the most indispensable thing your puppy needs to learn. Ordinary sound judgment ought to reveal to you why. Do you hope for your home to stay spic and span' Take care of your puppy's housebreaking thoroughly. Besides the preservation of your general domestic hygiene, trained dogs are contented dogs. As creatures of habit, it's in their make-up to maintain schedules as pack animals. Here is how you ought to housebreak your puppy:

Best Housebreaking Age

At the time your puppy attains the age of 8 to 12 weeks old, it's highly appropriate to start housebreaking. Bear in mind that slogan that old dogs can't learn new tricks' It is accurate so why take a chance?

Using a Crate Helps

Dog trainers recommend using a crate in housebreaking your puppy. A crate is similar to a cage, having you can see through bars and a locking door that locks. Its area ought to fit sufficiently the dogs dimensions for it to move about in. It ought to be utilized similar to a dog's bedroom. It is advised to not confine your puppy in his crate for longer than two hours at a time.

The thinking supporting using a crate in housebreaking your puppy is that dogs would not foul their areas where they sleep areas. Nevertheless, he may do so if you confine him in somewhere for longer than he can keep it in. At no time use a crate to penalize your dog, it would boomerang. Usually, pups that are three-months old have to deal with nature's needs every 3 hours, so you ought to lead him to a special out of doors comfort location more frequently.

Teach Your Puppy To Learn Routines

An additional tip is to exit the residence through one way out exclusively. This way out ought to be the one that you desire your dog to scratch to advise you concerning his being called by nature.

Taking your pup out at approximately the identical times every day would be extremely useful for the both of you. This would assist in establishing a habit, and would force him learn to keep it in waiting for you to become ready to accompany him out.

Watch For Clues

If your un-housebroken dog is used to roaming unrestricted about the home, look for signs that indicate to you he needs to do it. Be absolutely watchful enough of his behavior, i.e., a lot of sniffing, circling an room, staring at the door with a strong expression on his face, etc. If you discover him as he is relieving himself, halt him using a rapid snatch of his collar and draw it up at the same time asserting "No" using your bass, strict tone (don't forget to use a deep, surly speech as you state stating commands). Subsequently, accompany him into the outdoors and let him conclude what he had started. Afterwards, pat him on his head while stating "Good (his name)!" It is a must to have your dog get accustomed to getting praised whenever he does anything that makes you pleased. Offering him treats as a bonus whenever he does his business in the appropriate place can be very useful, too.

Being Patient is a Big Asset

Similar to any disciplinary endeavor, housebreaking requires a lot of tolerance. If you absolutely hate washing your dog's leavings off your Persian carpets on an hourly basis and having your entire residence smell similar to a community rest room, you want the housebreaking to be a success in a wink of an eye, if not sooner.

Common Sense Makes a Lot of Sense And Is the Way To Go

The use of common sense will aid you big a lot in handling your puppy's housebreaking. Thinking logically ought to let you know you to not give your dog water previous to bedtime if his inclination is to pee frequently at during the night time. Following his timetable as top priority should turn out to be extremely useful in having it slowly switch into yours.

Besides tolerance and common sense, regularity is likewise one of the significant factors of this dog disciplining exercise. If you suddenly draw a blank concerning the routines yourself, don't criticize if your dog if he starts committing accidents more frequently. Bear in mind that the stakes are significant (dirty and foul-smelling house). If you would prefer to succeed in this housebreaking achievement or nearly about in any additional disciplinary drills, don't handle it as a an amusement. Allocate sufficient time and dedication on your side.

Dog Bite: Prevent Or Deal With It

Statistics has it that 4.7 million people get bitten by dogs yearly. These bites range from minor nips to major attacks.
Dog is man's best friend, not his worst enemy. To make it stay that way, here are some tips for you to stay away from being bitten by a dog.

* How to Avoid being Bitten by A Dog

1. Don't Approach a Strange Dog.

It is a big no-no to go near just any dog you find adorable, particularly when that dog is tied or placed behind a fence or if it is in a car. A new or strange dog might think that you are threatening him or you are an intruder.

2. Don't Just Pet A Dog.

It is not advisable for anyone to suddenly just pet a dog, even his or her own dog, without letting him sniff and recognize you first.

3. Don't Ever Turn Your Back to a Dog Just to Run Away

This animal's instinct will dictate it chase and catch you. So, running away is not a good option.

4. Don't Disturb a Dog.

When a dog is sleeping, chewing on anything, caring for her puppies or eating, it is bad idea to shock or disturb it.

* How to Bite-Proof Your Own Dog

1. Neuter or spay your dog to reduce its tendency to roam and fight with other dogs.
2. Make it socialize to lessen its being nervous when a lot of people are around.
3. Train your dog to not chase anyone even when it's just for fun.
4. License your dog and provide for its regular care and rabies vaccinations.
5. Never let your dog roam alone.

* Things to Do if You are Bitten by A Dog

1. Never Panic.

This will only aggravate the situation. Stay calm and make sure that you make informed decisions.

2. Deal with the Wound Immediately.

Wash the wound thoroughly with soap and warm water. This should be done immediately. Then, contact your physician for more care and advice.

3. Tell the Animal Care and Control Agency in Your Location about the Bite.

Report to the animal control personnel all the information you can supply regarding the dog. If it is a stray dog, describe the dog, where you saw him, whether you are familiar with it and also the direction which he went.

Dog Bites Increase in Summer Months

They're called the "dog days of summer" for good reason. According to the Emergency Nurses Association, dog bites increase dramatically during the months of March through September.

Every year, 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs and 60 percent of those affected are children, with the most severe injuries occurring in children younger than 10 years old. That adds up to potentially 2.8 million scars on children each year from dog bites alone.

Being bitten by a dog can be a particularly traumatic event for anyone - especially for a child. While most dog-bite injuries are reported on the arms and hands, children seen in the emergency room for dog bites are more likely to have been bitten on the face, neck and head. In fact, children under 10 receive 65 percent of the reported dog bites to the face. Children are also 900 times as likely as letter carriers to be attacked by dogs.

Pediatrician-recommended Mederma for Kids is the first and only scar product created just for children to help reduce the appearance of scars. Mederma for Kids helps soften and smooth old and new scars resulting from cuts and scrapes, stitches, burns, bug bites and surgery.

Mederma for Kids has a unique color-changing feature - the gel goes on purple, and the color disappears as it is massaged into the scar. It also has a kid-friendly scent. Parents, too, can feel good about using Mederma for Kids because it has been proven safe for use in children as young as 2 and is non-toxic.

Dog Buyers Guide

Having a dog at home waiting for you to get back from work is a great thing that a lot of people cherish. But things are not as easy as they seem to be. Once you have a dog you also become a dog problem owner. Crazy barking, biting people, chewing on shoes or slippers are just a few problems that you will have to bare if having a dog in the house. Until you get your dog to learn some discipline and manners you might not enjoy 100% the time spent with your beloved pet.

Dogs can cause all sorts of problems from biting, barking and whining when there is no need for these doggy manifestations. A lot of people have complained that they have been embarrassed by their dog’s behavior and they need to do something about their dog’s lack of manners. Trying to solve these problems on your own is not a good idea and will not lead to a satisfactory result for sure. Another solution would be hiring a personal dog trainer, but this can be quite expensive and not all of the dog owners agree with the rough methods trainers apply on the dogs.

A solution is now offered by the people working at DogBuyersGuide. After years of studying dog behaviors and dog needs they have come up with a book that helps dog owners understand why their dogs act in certain ways. This book also gives reasonable solutions for teaching the dog on how to behave and stop embarrassing the owner in the society.

DogBuyersGuide will help the dog owners improve their teaching techniques, learn a lot of tricks on how to discipline their dogs and still remain friends with their pets after completing a set of dog behavior lessons. After reading the book DogBuyersGuyde wants to share with all the dog owners, you can forget about chewed slippers, the damage in your neighbor’s garden, the stress caused by midnight barking, bites on the leg of your boss and many other troubles that a dog can bring in one man’s life.

Saving a lot of money by choosing to teach your dog on your own on how to behave and not hiring an expensive dog trainer, spending more time with your pet and getting rid of all the embarrassment your dog could bring you are only a few advantages that come by just reading the book DogBuyersGuide has brought for you!

Dog Cages For A Happy Dog

There are many different styles and types of dog cages on the market and as expected there is also a huge range of prices.

While you might find people opposed to the suggestion of using dog cages, it is in actual fact something that most dogs are comfortable with.

Dog cages can offer your dog a sense of security, much like a child has a security blanket. By having their own little area they have a sense of security and this security can go with them if there is a need to travel.

If they feel safe within their dog cage they are less likely to become stressed when traveling in a motor vehicle.

By adding a favorite blanket or padding to the dog cage, the animal will feel comfortable and happy in familiar surroundings.

When buying a dog cage it needs to be big enough to allow your dog to stand up and turn around, but doesn't need to be any larger than that for the dog to feel comfortable. There will need to be enough room for the dog to lie down on it's side with it's legs outstretched and sleep comfortably.

Usually the biggest problem will be whether your motor vehicle is big enough to fit the dog cage inside, in a safe place.

You can expect to pay between $50 and $125 for a good quality dog cage that will be big enough for a medium to large dog.

It is a small price to pay for all the benefits of dog happiness and security, along with ease of transportation. A good quality dog cage should last the life of the animal if handled correctly, which makes it a relatively cheap investment.

The cage should be purchased based on the size of the full grown animal as you won't want to be replacing it after a year or so when you find that it is too small to house your pet when it is fully grown.

Some dog cages have dividers that are useful when transporting puppies as they restrict the area of the cage that they have access to, and as they grow the divider can be removed so they can use the whole cage.

When deciding on a dog cage you should look at all the alternatives that are offered by the biggest pet retailers on the Internet and look at all the price comparison websites to get the best deals.

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Dog Care: 6 Easy Steps for a Terrific (and safe) Romp in the Woods

Leaves are falling and paws are crunching in the parks....

What a beautiful

time of the year to get out with your canine companion and enjoy the crisp, cool air, frolic in the falling leaves and take in the visual splendor of nature. A walk in the woods can be an exhilarating experience for you and your dog, especially if you’ll take a moment for some basic dog care preparations. Minimize surprises and emergencies by following these simple steps.

I don’t know about you, but I will drive hours to find a place where the dogs can run free in nature. We all love it and often spend the whole day in the mountains together. I’ve developed a list of easy dog care to-do’s to ensure we have a great time and arrive and leave together safely.

I recommend the following items for your outdoor adventures:

1. Orange vests for you and your dog

This may sound like overkill, but I recently had an experience with my dogs that scared me. I was out in the woods with my dogs when I heard shots fired not far from me. I couldn’t see my dogs and terror ran through me. Immediately I realized we were not prepared for the hunters. Bright colored vests would have helped the hunters know we were not deer, and please don’t shoot us. Every year you hear the stories of accidental shootings. Don’t be the next casualty -- don your orange vests!

2. Current dog tags on collars

Keeping a collar and current dog tags on your dog helps others get him home if you get separated. One thing I have recently done is change the dog tags to read "I must be lost. This gives all the pertinent information, yet doesn’t provide information for an easy abduction. I don’t want someone to know my babies’ names, which might lead the dogs to believe the stranger is a friend.

3. Foot and body check during and after the outing

I check my dogs’ paws and body frequently to remove the debris from the fall season -- gum balls, seeds, burrs, rocks, thorns, pine needles, and leaves can add up to irritation or lameness.

4. Fresh water and a bowl

If I can help it, I don’t let my dogs drink standing water. I carry fresh water instead. I have had to deal with stomach problems in the past from bacteria in standing water. Carrying your own water is a small thing, but doing it can prevent lots of pain and suffering, a vet bill, and a 10-day supply of antibiotics.

5. Towels

I love towels, lots and lots of towels. To me, dropping dirty towels in the washer is much easier and less smelly than detailing a car or working to get that horrible wet, dirty dog smell out of fabric and carpet in my truck.

6. Whistle -- long range

Lastly, I whistle-trained my dogs. If we do separate, a blow on the whistle has them running to me. Chances are, they don’t like not being able to see me and will be happy to have me back in their sights. I highly recommend the ACME whistle that sounds from 2-5 miles. Get it on a lanyard and carry it with you.

These 6 simple steps can make your outdoor trip so much more enjoyable, for you and your dogs. And paying attention to the basics in dog care shows your dog just how much you love her.
Happy hiking!

Dog Care - How To Care For Your Dog

A dog will require care, attention and a commitment to look after it during its life which could be 10-15 years or longer. The commitment required includes not only routine feeding, care and time spent with the dog but also the provision of veterinary treatment if the dog becomes ill. Written below is some thing about dog caring:

Brushing your Dog’s Teeth

How to brush your dog's teeth?

Step one is to pick an appropriate pet toothbrush. Save yourself time by not buying a child's toothbrush which is usually too hard for dogs. The ideal dog toothbrush will have a long handle, an angled head to better fit the mouth and extra soft bristles. Another option is the finger toothbrush that fits over the tip of your finger.

Step two is to select appropriate toothpaste. The best pet toothpastes contain enzymes that help control plaque. Try to avoid toothpastes with baking soda, detergents, or salt sometimes found in human pastes. Fluoride may be incorporated to help control bacteria. Rather than placing the paste on top of the brush try to place it between the bristles. This allows the paste to spend the most time next to the teeth.

Step three is to get the brush with paste into your dog's mouth and all the teeth brushed. Most dogs accept brushing if they are approached in a gentle manner. If you can start when they are young, it's quite easy, but even older pets will accept the process. Start slowly, you can use a washcloth or piece of gauze to wipe the teeth, front and back in the same manner you will eventually be using the toothbrush. Do this twice daily for about two weeks and your dog should be familiar with the approach. Then take the pet toothbrush, soak it in warm water and start brushing daily for several days. When your dog accepts this brushing, add the pet toothpaste.

Dangerous Toys
Sticks and bones can splinter and cause choking or vomiting or they can perforate the mouth, throat or intestine. Hard bones can easily damage teeth. Instead, use hard, non-splintering chew toys to play fetch or to allow your pet to gnaw.

A chewing pet can shred soft, latex toys. If the toy includes a squeaking mechanism, the squeaker can be easily swallowed or cause choking.

Towels, socks, underwear and other similar clothing or materials can be swallowed by a rambunctious pet, causing intestinal obstruction.

Some dogs like to chew on or eat rocks-bad idea! Rocks can cause broken teeth and serious intestinal obstruction if swallowed.

Be careful if you offer your pet rawhides, as these can also cause intestinal obstruction if swallowed, and some are preserved with arsenic, which is toxic to pets.

Be aware of sharp objects that can cut skin, feet, eyes or ears.

Paint and wood preservatives can also be toxic to your feathered friend.

Exercising Your Pet

Whenever you are near a road, or wherever your dog is likely to cause a nuisance if he runs free, you should keep him on a lead. Both you and your dog will be much happier if he’s well trained. Remember that not everyone is as fond of dogs as you are and you must respect their feelings. Keep your dog under control at all times. Part of your walk should take your dog over hard ground, as this will help to keep his nails short.

Don't make the mistake of over-exercising your dog if he’s still growing, as his bones aren’t yet strong enough to cope with the extra stress this puts on him. Little and often is the rule until your dog grows to full strength. Remember that large breeds mature later than small breeds. Ask the breeder or your vet for their advice.

Regular and varied walks are not just essential to keep your dog fit. They also give him the chance to explore and to experience new stimuli, including meeting other dogs. This will help him develop into a contented and well-adjusted dog, and avoid developing problem behavior. Make sure you supervise your dog’s exercise. Do not allow him to stray and never put him outside for the day to fend for him while you’re gone.

Keep Your Pet Happy and Healthy

Once you've brought home your new pet, you'll want to have a long and happy life together. Here are some ways to make that happen
Eating well and getting enough exercise are as important for dogs and cats as they are for people. Unfortunately, too often pets pick up the same bad habits, and health problems, as people do. Diabetes, heart disease, and obesity related arthritis are problems that are often preventable with a good diet and regular exercise.

A high quality dry pet food is a good centerpiece for a healthy diet. If your pet is active enough to burn the calories, most dogs and cats love canned food. It can be mixed with dry food or put out separately as a treat. Some people like to leave food out all the time so that their pets can nibble when hungry while others prefer to have regular feeding times. Either way, make sure that pets always have access to clean drinking water.

Dog Carriers: There's One That Works for You!

If you travel with your pet, you need a dog carrier. But which kind should you get? Carriers come in all different sizes. Some are rigid, and some are soft and pliable. The type of dog carrier you buy should depend on the size of your pet and the kind of traveling you do.

Travel by Car

If you travel by car, either a hard plastic or wire crate will do. Some wire crates fold down for storage and portability, which comes in extremely handy if your situation requires that you move the crate in and out of your vehicle. What size should the dog crate be? Well, take a good look at your dog! The crate should be large enough so that the dog can stand up, turn around, and lie down comfortably, but not so large that the dog slips around during travel.

Travel by Airplane

When choosing a dog carrier for airplane travel, you'll have to take airline size restrictions into consideration.

Better safe than sorry! You don't want to arrive at the airport only to find out that your carrier doesn't heed the restrictions. It's safe to check with the ticketing agent ahead of time regarding dog carrier size limits, but keep in mind that these rules usually refer to hard-sided dog carriers. Smaller dogs can be carried in soft-sided dog carriers like Sherpa Bags and the Pet Wheel-Away. Carriers such as these are approved for in-cabin use and can be stowed under the airplane seat.

Make sure the carrier has an absorbent liner. Some models are equipped with them. With others, an old towel or blanket should do the trick.

If you are still not sure which size and type of pet carrier to pick, check online retailers for manufacturer's guidelines. They can help you select the right size and type for your dog.

Comfort Counts

Remember, you are going to be the one toting the carrier around, so make sure it fits you well! The carrier should be light enough for you to manage over the distance you plan on carrying it, and should be carried comfortably. It's always a good idea to test a carrier before you buy it; make sure the shoulder straps are the right length and there is sufficient padding where it meets your shoulder.

Just for Fun

Once you have the important stuff in order, you can have lots of fun with styles, colors, materials, and patterns. Soft dog carriers come in a variety of materials including canvas, nylon, denim, and synthetic leather. You can find them in all kinds of styles, from practical to precious, and in just about every color possible. Designer carriers often mimic the styles popular in handbag fashions, so it's not hard to find one that suits your style.

With the right dog carrier, traveling with your pet is a breeze!

Dog Clothes

Some people love to make their dogs as cute as can be. For these folks there are dog clothes. Cute sweaters, doggie tee shirts, dog booties, stylish bandanas, and precocious little hats are among the items people will purchase to adorn their dogs with style. Dressing a dog is more about the owner than the animal, but as long as the clothing isn’t restrictive or overly cumbersome, most dogs don’t mind getting dressed up now and then for a night (or day) on the town and some breeds, especially those that crave attention, quite enjoy it.

The advent of the internet has taken the concept of dressing our dogs to new levels as websites offering all manner of “designer” dog clothing have popped up everywhere. With names like Glamour Dog, Designer Dog Wear, and Paw Printz Boutique (dot com, of course), these sites offer the tops in canine fashion for proud owners to place on their pups.

Years ago it was not uncommon to see a dog in a knit sweater or some other cute clothing article, but today there are nearly as many clothing choices for dogs as there are for people. There are dresses and slacks, raincoats, eyewear, headwear, footwear, and every imaginable item. There is doggie casual wear, for hanging around on the beach, doggie formal wear for those special black tie occasions and even doggie wedding gowns and tuxedos for the wedding of a doggie’s dreams!

In many cases the doggie designer clothing comes complete with a doggie designer price tag. Dog dresses at Glamour Dog dot com, for example, are listed with prices that run from $40.00 (for a to die for Mary Jane dress) to $86.00 (Pretty Pink Formal Dress). Some of these dog clothes cost more than a lot of people spend to dress themselves. But, the sites stay in business. Someone is buying this stuff.

Some personal favorites include the doggie trench coat ($70.00), the various college football jerseys ($25.00), and the 100% cotton doggie bathrobe – perfect for the pooch who wants to emulate Hugh Heffner.

The recent trend in excessive doggie clothing is undoubtedly spurred by the popularity of celebrity dogs like Paris Hilton’s infamous Tinkerbell and Anna Nicole Smith’s Prozac-popping puppy, Sugar Pie. Both pooches are rarely seen in public without some form of attire and the PR pooches are having an influence.

So, if you’re in the market for dog clothes that will turn heads and get your pooch noticed, designer doggie duds may be just what the fashion critic ordered. Just be sure not to combine designer labels or adorn your dog in designs that clash. After all, what could be more gauche?

Dog Clothes: Essential Fashion Items For Your Dog

A dog is a man’s best friend. Yes! The affable chap is your best companion. If you own a dog, you definitely love to shower him with affection. Anything you do for your dog, even a little attention, brings him happiness. And you love him like a baby. Don’t you?

You probably spend a lot of money on quality dog food, biscuits and vet bills. But does your dog possess a sufficient variety of clothing? Why it roams stark naked at times. It’s time you get some really cool dog clothes for your favorite friend this season. The clothes your dog wears reflect your personal style statement.

Are you aware of the fact that clothing for dogs is readily available in the market? The range varies from dog coats to dog hats, dog formal wear, dog collars and much more.

One of the essential items of dog clothing includes dog coats. Dog coats are used to protect your dog and enhance its living quality. Dog coats provide essential warmth for your dog during cold weather. Dog coats also protect the vital organs of dog such as his heart and lungs from getting affected by the cold weather. Dog coats, besides keeping your dog warm, keep your dog clean and dry. It can even protect your dog from skin disorders and allergies.

Dog coats are available in different designs and styles. They are available as denim coats, hooded coats, rough style coats and in many more patterns.

Dog T-Shirts are meant for well-dressed dogs. When your dog wears a pretty T-shirt he looks special and nice. Dog T-shirts too are essential for your dog A good quality T-shirt can help prevent harmful sunrays affecting your dog. Dog T- shirts also help in keeping your dog warm when it gets cool during at night. T-shirts are available as cotton T-shirts, velour T-shirts and in many more fabrics.

Dogs can develop skin cancer! If your dog is out and about in the sunshine a lot there is the risk of him developing skin cancer. Skin cancer is known to affect a majority of dogs more than any other type of cancer. So it becomes quintessential for you to protect your dog against skin cancer. Provide your dog with a dog sun suit. Dog sun suits are made using UV resistant fabric. This fabric greatly reduces the chance of skin cancer in your dog. Now you can leave your dog in the sunshine or play with him for hours in the sun without the worry.

Pet-jamas and playsuits for your dog are also readily available. These are beneficial if you like to play with your pet inside the house. These pet-jamas and playsuits act as essential and natural dog coats. It even keeps your house furniture and bed clean from unwanted doggy hair.

If it is raining outside, and you want to take your dog along for a walk, what would you do? You have a raincoat for yourself. What would your dog wear? Do not worry at all! A variety of dog raincoats are available. Dog raincoats are especially made from polyester backed vinyl and are available in all sizes. They even have a hole for the lead too. Now you can take your dog out, without getting him wet in the rain, making him the envy of other dogs.

Dog hats are another classy clothing item for your lovely dog. These hats come in various shapes, sizes and fabrics. Dog hats help to shade the eyes of your dear pet. Hats also provide your dog with great sun protection. Slip a hat onto your dog, ensuring it is well protected and looks smart and cool too.

Doing a little shopping for your dog can improve his living style and protect him from many diseases and dangers. Go on, be indulgent and buy something for your four-legged friend today.

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Dog Clothes - Fad, Fun Or Functional??

Your dog is not just a pet. Your dog is not just an animal. Your dog is a bona FIDO member of the family!! So of course your dog needs to dress the part – right?

Well thanks to the internet and the many online boutiques you can dress your dog for every occasion from the comfort of your own home. No more “granny’ knitted sweaters for your sophisticated canine!! But is dressing up your dog just something that you like to do? Is there any benefit to your dog? It all depends on why you bought the clothes!!

A Dog Coat can be a very useful item of clothing for your dog. It can keep him warm in the cold weather, dry in the wet weather and can protect him from infections in the same way that our clothes protect us. It can also keep him clean which may be especially useful after a romp in the park on a wet winter’s day. Just take the coat off after it’s dirty and keep most of the dirt contained. Then you can let your clean(ish) dog into the car which helps keep the car cleaner. Dog coats come in many different styles and colors so pick the coat that's most appropriate for its use. And of course what dog would be seen out without the matching doggie hat??

Just like people wear, you can get ‘designer’ labels for your dog to make him feel like a million dollars, (and it probably costs that too). Many celebrities always have their dogs dressed in the latest doggie fashion. A practice that Paris Hilton with Tinkerbell has raised to an art form, or so it seems!

Apart from coats and sweaters other useful dog clothing items include dog t-shirts and dog sunglasses. These can look cute but they do also serve to help protect your pet. The sunglasses can protect him from UVA and UVB rays and the t-shirt helps protect his skin. Dogs can develop skin cancer the same way that people can and this is one of the main cancers in dogs. And you thought it was just to make Fido look cute!!

As you can see, getting clothing for your dog is not just vanity on your part, although it is fun dressing up your dog. It can also play a vital role in keeping your dog healthy and happy. And if you do get the urge to step out on the wild side – get your dog some formal wear or a great costume for Halloween – go on have fun and buy your dog some great clothing today!!

Dog Containment and the Option of an Underground or Buried Wire Fence

I remember when I grew up we lived in the country and everyone in the neighborhood owned a dog. The streets had little traffic and there was lots of space between the houses and lots of woods and fields for all to roam. You could expect to see any of your friend’s dogs during the course of your travels during the day. It seemed more like the dogs belonged to the neighborhood, but each dog knew where to go for their dinner and when it was time to sleep. When I turned 16 and began driving, I remember seeing my dog a mile or so away from our house and pulling over in the car to give her a ride home. From the look on her face I could tell she had a great day exploring the woods, chasing scents, and probably getting into a bit of mischief. She also looked glad to see me and exhausted. I knew she appreciated the lift.

I look back on the days with fond memories. But, those days are over. The reality of today is that the streets are busier and more and more people are overly possessive about their “space” – which doesn’t allow much sympathy for the roaming dog that knows no boundaries and doesn’t understand leash laws or the concept of “pooper scoopers”. Heck, neighbors barely know each other anymore let alone their neighbor’s dogs. And, finally, thanks to irresponsible pet owners and our ever-evolving litigious society, we have to fear lawsuits associated with pet ownership. So, it is now understood (and legislated in most cases) that dog owners must have a reliable way to contain their dog within their own yard. I have to admit this is not all bad despite my rosy colored memories of my youth.

There are many options available to achieve this containment goal. The obvious include traditional fencing or just keeping your dog on a leash every time he is outside. Some people choose outdoor pens or tying the dog to a cable. There are benefits and drawbacks to each of these methods. Finally, a method that is relatively new on the scene uses a radio frequency to establish a boundary for your dog (a.k.a. underground fences or invisible fencing).

Lets take a quick look at some of the benefits and drawbacks to these methods.

Traditional fencing – Can be very effective if your dog is not prone to climbing or digging, but it becomes ineffective if a gate is left open by mistake. This is also a fairly expensive containment option and is usually limited to only the backyard.

Outdoor Pens and Cable tethering – This is very restrictive to the dog and the cable option has the potential for harming the dog if he gets tangled. In most cases that I’ve seen the dog stays in one spot in both of these situations, even when the pen is fairly large or the cable is long. Extensive use of these methods can cause stress to the dog that often translates to a variety of behavior issues.

Underground Pet Fencing - This option uses fairly basic technology to help you train your dog where his boundary is and provides an influential reason for him to choose to stay in his own yard.

Since everyone understands how the traditional methods work, I wanted to elaborate on the newest method and explain how it works while addressing some common questions.

Why an Underground Fence?
There are many reasons to choose this option for containing your pet. Most obvious is that in some areas of the country traditional fences our not allowed because a decision was made to keep an open look to the area. But, even in areas that allow chain link or other traditional fences, an underground fence can still be a necessary or desired choice for the dog owner. Dogs contained with this method will not be able to dig or jump through it, will have access to the front yard, and will stay contained even when a gate is open.

The way this technology works is that a radio transmitter is installed inside the house – but on an outside wall. This transmitter is connected to the wire that is typically buried a few inches under the ground. This wire simply acts as the antenna for the radio transmitter and broadcasts a radio frequency in the vicinity of the buried wire (antenna). The dog is wearing a collar (think of it as the radio) that is tuned in to the right “station” and it picks up the signal when it is close enough to the buried wire. When the collar picks up the signal it gives a warning tone and then an electric stimulus if the dog doesn’t choose to move away from the wire. With proper training, the dog quickly learns his boundaries and decides that he doesn’t want to receive the electric stimulus. It’s that simple. Naturally, with any electronic device, there are a myriad of options and features that can be had, but the basic concept remains the same. The dog gets a negative stimulus if he carries his “radio” too close to the “antenna”.

There are several questions that people ask when they learn about this technology. The first is, does it really work? The answer is, absolutely. Most companies report success in over 99% of the cases.

The next question is, is it cruel? Well, this can easily be debated at length, but in my opinion the answer is a resounding “no”. Not because the negative stimulus isn’t unpleasant, because it is (if it wasn’t it wouldn’t work!). What most people don’t know is that a properly trained dog may only receive this stimulus a small handful of times in his entire life (most during the initial week of training). In exchange for this handful of negative experiences your dog will obediently stay in his own yard and avoid the possibility of truly serious injury or possible death from getting hit by a car. In addition, your dog will avoid spending endless hours at the end of a cable or chain or prison-like confinement in a pen.

The next question is why would I need this if I already have a real fence? The answer to this is that you may not, but you may wish to for several reasons. You may not need this option if your dog stays in the yard and probably would not run off if a gate were left open. But, many dogs only see a traditional fence as a puzzle to solve. They either figure out a way to dig or chew through a traditional fence. I owned a dog years ago that was able to pull apart a chain link fence and break the welds of welded wire fencing. This dog did incredible things when a storm was approaching. This same dog even learned to vertically climb many fences. Even if a traditional fence successfully contains your dog, the owner may choose to add an underground fence in order to take advantage of some of their benefits. An underground fence can add access to the front yard for your dog and will prevent your dog from running through an open gate.

There are many things to consider when deciding to own a pet, and one of the most important is how you will be able to contain him safely in your yard. It is no longer a choice just to open the door and let him run. Responsible pet ownership requires more today than in the past, as it should.

Dog Crates And Cages

So you are looking for a dog crate and you want the highest quality you can get for the best price. What options are available to you, and what are the pro’s and con’s of the various types of dog crate.

Firstly, let first look at the black epoxy coated crates. They look great when they are new, but they chip so easily and look tatty after only a few uses and let’s be honest if you are spending good money then you will want real value for your money and not something that is going look tatty within a short period of time.

Secondly, let’s consider those plastic bases that some companies put in the crates. Plastic bases often crack, and split and as well as this dogs often chew them, so in reality there is no advantage to a plastic base except for possibly saving the manufacturer a little money on material and labour costs?

Thirdly, there is chrome for cages - they look great, at first and then you find they also chip and flake because chrome is just another coating. Be aware that the flaking chrome if ingested by a dog could make them unwell. In fact you don’t really see many chrome ones around these days which is a good thing. So what are you left with?

Well you are left with galvanised crates. These are by far the best option, and the top quality galvanised crates have the following features:

• Galvanised for non-rust long lasting
• Polished finish
• Anti-tamper locks
• Very heavy gauge mesh frame
• Metal tray that can’t be chewed and wont split or crack
• Assembles in three moves
• Wont chip or flake
• Lasts for years
• Slide out tray
• Wholesale Prices

The major difference between types of galvanised dog crates is the gauge of the mesh used. Some companies are now offering 9mm gauge wire mesh which has incredible strength and lasts a long, long time.

Dog Crates / Dog Cages offer an effective way to housebreak puppies, keep your pets safe either at home or away or dog crates can also be used by professional show dog owners. Some crates now offer an innovative build and design that allows simple assembly and disassembly in seconds and are galvanised which prevents against rust and deterioration and is safe for your dog - this means they will look great for many years to come. When not in use, the cage/crate folds flat for easy transport and storage.

Dog Crates Demystified

If you are a dog owner but don't own a dog crate, then you are missing out! Dog crates make pet ownership much easier, and are a great way to train man's best friend. They also provide a safe haven for your dog to rest and relax, and are very useful if you travel. So, what should you look for in a dog crate? Depending upon the crate's main use, you'll want to consider safety, size, durability, and how easy it is to clean.

Safety First

To determine whether a particular dog crate is a safe choice for your particular pet, take a good look at its design. How does the front door close? Steer clear of spring-loaded doors, which can snap shut on unsuspecting paws and tails. If the dog crate is wire, make sure that the grid size is small enough so that your dog's paws can't fall through. And it goes without saying that there should be no sharp edges or exposed wires.


Determine the Crate's Intended Use

How you are going to use the dog crate should determine which kind you purchase. For example, if you travel by car a foldable, wire crate will fit the bill. If you travel by airplane you'll most likely want a plastic, airline-approved model. Both wire and plastic crates are easy to clean and durable. Wire crates have the added benefits of increased visibility and ventilation.

Size

The size of the crate is very important. The crate should be large enough so that the dog has plenty of room, but not so large that it isn't cozy. The dog should have plenty of room to stand up and turn around, but should not be able to run from side to side. The only exception to this rule is if you are buying the crate for a puppy. In that case, you'll want a crate that your dog can grow into.

More Dog Crate Tips

Throughout your dog's life there will definitely be situations in which he will need to be kenneled. To that end, getting your dog used to being crated is very important! Show your dog that his crate is a safe place by placing comfortable blankets, appealing toys, and tasty treats inside. And never, ever use your dog's crate as a means of punishment. The goal is to get your dog to love, accept, and find comfort in his crate, and he'll never do that if he comes to associate it with negative circumstances. While a crate can be a very important part of your dog's overall training, don't use it to isolate your pet because of bad behavior.

Where to Find Your Dog Crate

Dog crates in all different shapes and sizes, for a wide variety of purposes, are available from local and online pet retailers. Many pet-related retailers have articles and information regarding dog crates that can help you make the right choice.

Dog Dental Heath Care For Your American Pit Bull Terrier

One of the most often overlooked areas in care of Pit Bulls involves dental health. It is important not only in caring for his teeth, but in also protecting his overall well being. Being able to chew food properly affects digestion, which can lead to all kinds of health problems for your Pit Bull. Learning how to care for your Pit Bull’s dental health needs at home can save you a lot of out of pocket expense over your Pit Bull’s lifetime.
Believe it or not, you should try to brush your dog’s teeth at least once everyday. Just like you, your Pit Bull will have plaque and tartar that can destroy his teeth or lead to gum disease. It could result in your Pit Bull losing his teeth, or developing an infection.

If you haven’t already developed a dental hygiene routine for your Pit Bull, you may need to take it slow and easy to get him used to the idea. Begin by getting him used to you holding him and looking inside his mouth. If you have an older Pit Bull, just holding the dog long enough to look in his mouth may be a challenge at first. Once you get him comfortable with you holding him and looking inside his mouth, start lifting up his lips and moving his tongue around so you can actually see his teeth. These first couple steps may take your Pit Bull some time to get used to, so be patient.

Once he is comfortable with you messing with his mouth, see your veterinarian to get a toothpaste recommended for him. Start by using the toothpaste on your finger for a few days, to get him used to the taste and feeling of you rubbing his teeth. Your Pit Bull will probably enjoy this, especially if he gets flavored toothpaste. He will definitely love the extra attention.
Eventually, your Pit Bull will let you brush his teeth, which will help protect his teeth and health. Dental problems in Pit Bulls can be very painful for them, and can often be hard to treat successfully.

If by some chance you have a Pit Bull that absolutely will not let you near his mouth, let alone brush his teeth, there are some alternative ways to ensure his dental health. Your veterinarian can recommend a good dental rinse that can be added to your Pit Bull’s water bowl to help rid the teeth of debris. Chew toys will also help clean the teeth and keep his bones strong and healthy. Be careful when buying chew toys for your Pit Bull to make certain the toy isn’t hard enough to damage his teeth, and is large enough so he can’t get choked on it.

There are some dog foods now available that are supposed to provide dental care, which actually means that the food sticks to plaque and tartar as the dog chews, therefore getting it off the teeth.

Remember, that to provide proper care for your Pit Bull, you cannot omit his dental health. By taking the time to provide dental care when your Pit Bull is a puppy, you can start ensuring his dental health in the beginning, which will save you a lot of costly vet bills as time goes by.

Dog Flea Control Management: How To Prevent, Treat, And Kill Dog Fleas

Dog flea control and management requires an integrated approach. For effective treatment both the host animal and the environment must be treated at the same time. Control of fleas on the pet generally requires the use of insecticides. Although flea combs can remove some fleas, combing should be thought of as a method for detecting fleas rather than removing them.

If an animal is to be treated for other conditions besides fleas, such as expression of anal glands, these procedures should be done before the insecticide application to minimize insecticide contact with interior mucosal membranes.

A wide range of insecticides are available for flea control. The pyrethrins and pyrethroids have the lowest mammalian toxicity. These insecticides come in many formulations including shampoo, dust and powder, mousse, aerosol and non-aerosol mist or spray, dip, spot-on, roll-on and collar. Organophosphate drugs for oral use are available, by prescription from veterinarians.

In addition, some on-animal formulations contain insect growth regulators (IGRs) that kill flea eggs on the animal. *Remember to read all insecticide labels, and to follow all precautions and dose directions.

The insecticides used for flea control vary widely in toxicity and efficacy. Considerations for selecting a formulation include the size, weight and age of the animal, as well as the species.

For example, greyhounds are a very chemical-sensitive breed and are more sensitive to insecticide products than most other dogs. Do not attach flea collars or flea-killing medallions on these dogs. Do not use chlorpyrifos, DDVP, methoxychior or malathion on greyhounds.

Cats are more sensitive to organophosphate insecticides than dogs. In addition, cats groom themselves more than dogs and are more likely to ingest an insecticide by licking the residue from their fur.

Kittens and puppies, because of their smaller size, require a lower dose than adult animals. Young animals may also require treatment with insecticides of lower toxicity than adult animals. Pregnant or nursing animals may be sensitive to certain insecticides.

Several products are available for especially sensitive pets and other situations that require lower risk chemical measures. These include the citrus peel extracts d-limonene and linalool, sorptive dusts such as silica aerogel or diatomaceous earth, the insect growth regulators fenoxycarb or methoprene, and insecticidal soaps.

Theses words may seem foreign to you, but you can always consult a veterinarian if you have questions. They will have accurate information on insecticides and their use for flea control on pet animals. The insecticide label should also contain accurate information on how a particular formulation of an insecticide should and should not be used. *Remember to read these labels before opening the container!

When using insecticides for flea control, remember that the applicator, namely your pet and you can be exposed to the insecticides several times. The label may call for the use of gloves and other protective equipment during application and suggest the pet not be handled with unprotected hands until the treatment dries. All personal protective equipment listed on the label must be worn. As a minimum aspect, chemical-resistant gloves, apron and goggles should be worn while mixing insecticides and during application to prevent insecticide contact with the skin.

The working area should be appropriate for containment of the pesticide and should be resistant to caustic materials. A stainless steel preparation table and stainless steel or ceramic tub are ideal. Also, certain parts of the pet’s body (such as the eyes) may be sensitive to the insecticides and must be shielded during application. When using flea “bombs” (aerosol cans with a self-releasing mechanism), follow all the precautions and remove the pets from the area being treated. For your information, using excessive aerosols is illegal and may cause fires and even explosions.

The other important part of an integrated flea management program is to control larval fleas in the habitat away from the animal. This can be achieved either mechanically or with insecticides. Mechanical or physical control of flea larvae involves removal and laundering of animal bedding and thorough cleaning of areas frequented by the animal.

Using a vacuum with a beater bar and immediately disposing of the waste bag effectively eliminates up to half of the larvae and eggs in carpet. You should also launder animal bedding and thoroughly clean areas the animal frequents and dispose of the vacuum waste bag after every cleaning.

Do not put insecticides in the vacuum cleaner bag. This is an illegal and dangerous use of the products and can harm you, your family and pets by creating dusts or fumes that could be inhaled.

Another mechanical control measure is carpet shampooing or steam cleaning. This rids the carpet of blood feces, an important food for the larvae, and may also remove eggs and larvae. In outdoor areas, cleaning up the places where animals like to rest reduces eggs and larvae and removes blood pellets. In yards and kennels, flea larvae can be found in cracks at wall-floor junctions and in floor crevices. These areas must be thoroughly cleaned and then maintained to prevent another infestation.

Recently several ultrasound devices, including collars, have entered the market claiming to control or repel fleas. Several scientific studies have investigated these devices and found absolutely no basis for the manufacture’s claims. Ultrasonic devices do not control flea populations. It is unnecessary for you to buy these equipments.

Chemical control of flea larvae can be achieved with insecticides. Organophosphate, carbamate, pyrethrin, pyrethroid and growth regulator (hormone mimic) insecticides as well as certain minerals are available for flea control in the environment These insecticides are formulated as coarse sprays, foggers and dusts or are micro-encapsulated.

All but the growth regulators kill flea larvae on contact. Insect growth regulators prevent flea larvae from developing to the adult stage. Growth regulators may also inhibit egg hatching. A good flea larval control program will incorporate sanitation, contact insecticides and growth regulators for good results.

Flea management requires patience, time and careful planning. Vacuuming and cleaning areas frequented by dogs and cats should be routine. The same applies to kennels. If an infestation occurs, insecticide applications on the animals or in the environment may have to be repeated according to the label. The need for retreatment and time intervals between insecticide treatments will vary with the kind of insecticide and the formulation.

Flea control will not be successful if only one approach is used. The animal and its environment must be treated simultaneously, and that treatment must be combined with regular sanitation efforts. Read all product labels carefully. Do not overexpose your pet by combining too many treatments at one time, such as a collar, a shampoo and a dust. Pesticides have a cumulative effect. Be aware of each product’s toxicity and do not endanger yourself or the animal by using excessive amounts of any one product or by combining products.

To end, please remember that flea control will only be successful when you treat both your pet and the environment simultaneously. Hope this article is useful in helping you manage flea problems.

Dog Fleas & Ticks

Dog Fleas & Ticks.

Fleas.

Dog fleas are different to those which infest humans and cats. When a flea bites, it injects saliva to stop the blood clotting whilst it sucks it up. The saliva contains chemicals which often cause an allergic reaction in the dog.

The signs are :-

Bites which look like small red pimples. Black, gritty material in the coat, and areas of inflammation on the animals back. Scratching.

What is the treatment ?

Spring-clean the house and treat the dog's favorite places with a suitable insecticidal spray. Flea tablets or collars are a good extra precaution, and spray badly affected animals frequently with insecticide during the summer months. (the flea season) Ticks The common tick seen on dogs is the sheep tick. this has a large abdomen that stretches as it fills with blood. It hangs on to the dog's hair and sticks it's mouth parts through the skin to suck blood.Ticks are usually found on the underside of the dog, under the forelegs and on the head.

What is the treatment ?

Try to remove every tick when you see it. It is important to extract the head, otherwise an abscess may form. If the head is left in, warm compresses help draw out the infection, combined with antibacterial washes and creams.

Removing a tick.

A good method is to get the tick's head to relax or die by dabbing it with alcohol. Wait a couple of minutes, then use fine-pointed tweezers to extract the tick. Grasp it near the mouth parts, and give it a sharp jerk. This should dislodge it.

Alternatively, flea sprays can be used locally on ticks. The tick will then die and can be removed the following day. Regular use of a flea spray in tick areas often keeps them away.

When my own dogs have suffered with ticks or fleas in the past, I've always managed to deal with them myself, but if you've any concerns at all with your own dog, then consult your vet as a precaution.

Dog fleas can cause more than itching.

Simple facts about dog fleas:


Fleas are probably the most successful creatures on the planet in terms of reproduction. There are over 2,400 species and they are difficult to control for a variety of reasons: One female flea will produce 25,000 offspring in one month. An unfed adult can live for several months. The chemicals used to eradicate adult dog fleas have no effect on the eggs. Fleas are very good at mutating to resist new pesticides.

Fleas are a menace to dogs! They cause allergic dermatitis, tapeworms, and anemia. Most of the eggs are not laid on the dog but in the dog's bedding, in the rug, and on the furniture. It is extremely difficult to eradicate fleas completely. The most you can hope for is to control them and to keep your dog reasonably comfortable during the warm, moist flea season.

The best way to control dog fleas is to remove them from your dog and your house. Take him to a groomer for the day and have him bathed with veterinarian-approved flea shampoo. Spraying or dipping him with a residual pesticide has little or no lasting effect. While he is out of the house, hire a company that uses a non-toxic product to spray the carpets and the furniture. These companies usually guarantee a flea-free home for one year.

Some dogs are bothered more by the use of pesticides than they are by fleas. Flea collars, sprays, powders, and shampoos are all loaded with pesticides. Beware! If your dog is into serious scratching, your veterinarian can prescribe medication for the itching. It is also very important that you discus with your veterinarian which products you should use on your pet to rid him (or her) of dog fleas. There are a lot of products on the market that claim to get rid of fleas; not all of them work and some could be harmful to your dog.

From this point on, it is important for you to vacuum the carpets, furniture, and your dog's bedding everyday. Place the cut-off end of a flea collar, or a moth crystal, into your vacuum cleaner bag to kill any vacuumed adult fleas. Vacuum the dog if he will let you! Groom him daily with a flea comb. Do not be surprised if you occasionally find a flea on him. He will bring them in from outside. Remember, you cannot get rid of them, only control them.

Dog Food Tips For Preventing Fussy Eaters

There is much to recommend feeding your dog homemade dog food if you have the time to prepare it, and make sure you have recipes that give the correct ratio of nutrients, as well as the vitamins and supplements you'll need to add. These can be mixed up in a bag, stored, and sprinkled in every meal.

Dogs should have a minimum of 18% protein for maintenance when they are adults, and 22% for reproduction and growth. Fat should be a minimum of 5% for adult dogs, and 8% for reproduction and growth. But the more fat that is in the diet, the more protein there should be. Fat makes dogs, as well as people, eat less by making them feel fuller. If they eat less, and there are less of other essential nutrients like protein and vitamins and minerals, the dog will not get the nourishment it needs.

Generally, commercial pet food is made according to the appropriate guidelines, but care should be taken if significant amounts of other food is added to the diet, and it is high in fat.

But whether you're feeding your dog commercial dog food, or home made dog food, there are a few things to keep in mind so you don't end up with a fussy dog:

* dogs should be fed once a day once they are no longer puppies, or two small meals, no more. Feeding your dog too frequently when he is older can turn him appear like a fussy eater, when he is actually full.

* feeding your dog too regularly can get him into the routine of expecting to eat at those times, too, and may lead to weight gain. Letting him get hungry, and feeding sensibly, will not harm him. In the wild, dogs would eat for once a day until they were completely full.

* Don't stand and stare at your dog waiting for him to eat. He will likely think something is wrong, or something else is coming, and won't eat.

* Don't give into your dog and give him something else straight away if he refuses his meal, as he's effectively training you and not the other way around!

* There's nothing wrong with feeding your dog a varied diet, but don't keep changing the food because he seems fussy and won't eat it. Make sure nothing is wrong with him physically first, then if he is healthy, take charge of the situation. Put his food down, leave him to it, and then 30 minutes later go and check to see whether it's been eaten. If it hasn't, take it away, then at the end of the day put down some fresh food. Repeat the process, and take it away 30 minutes later if it still isn't eaten. This way you'll train your dog to eat his food, and not reinforce his behaviour.

Brian Kilcommons has a very interesting method for teaching dogs to eat their food. When the above fails, he prepared the dog food in front of the dog, making lots of 'yummy' noises whilst he did it. He made it slowly, and when the dog still wasn't interested, he put it down in front of his face, then took it straight away and threw it out. He did this first at breakfast, then at dinner. At dinner, the dog in question was more interested, but he still threw it out after putting it in front of him. The next morning, the dog was jumping up and down whilst the food was being prepared. He put it down, pulled it away, then looked at him for about a minute, then left it for him to eat. That dog now eats anything put down for him.

* If your dog suddenly goes off his food, it could be because he has dental problems, or a stomach problem. Get him checked out by the vet.

* Some dogs do actually prefer a certain type of food, just as people do. Try your dog with a variety of foods, and if he only eats one type, and will starve himself if he doesn't get it, the best solution can simply be to feed him that type of food.

* Don't feed your dog a high fat diet, or junk food, including chocolate. It's not good for them.

References: Brian Kilcommons, Good Owners, Great Dogs

Dog Gets Into Water Garden When Owner Is At Work

Dear Mr. Katz,

I've read your book and it's been interesting as well as helpful - it's taught me to teach my dog some new behaviors and discipline.

However, I wouldn't be writing if I still didn't have a lingering problem.

The water garden is obviously too much fun to ignore. And there's birds landing in there to take a bath! I'm nearly convinced it's the birds tempting her, but I could be wrong. I don't think she really sees the fish.

In any case, I have tried the Snappy Trainers - the devices that work like a mouse trap but just make a big noise when tripped. She does not like them at all. But either I don't have enough of them or something else is getting her attention to the point that they don't matter. I have also tried leaving her in the house - that works too, but in the long run, I'd rather have her outdoors. As a side note, my fiancé's Malamute was here for a week and also thinks the pond is the cat's meow - and she's the last dog we thought would venture into that much water. Help.

Thanks,
Sue

Dear Sue:

It's the same as house-proofing your dog, garden-proofing, etc...

You need to keep the dog confined to a dog run when you cannot supervise him.

Only allow him to run free in the yard when you can spy on him. This may take a couple of months or more, but the benefits will be a lifetime of reliability.

This is really the type of behavior where an electronic collar makes life easy. Instead of running outside to correct the dog, the dog instead things that the correction came from the water garden itself. This makes the training process A LOT FASTER. (Ever notice how quickly dogs learn not to play around in thorny rose bushes???)

If you don't want to get an e-collar, then leave the training collar on the dog, and do the "No, no, no" routine that I outlined in the book. This will work just the same.

That's all for now, folks!
Adam

Dog Grooming: Caring For the Ears

Dogs ears are prone to infection as you might already have noticed if you have a dog with problem ears. If your dog keeps getting infections here is some information that might help you deal with chronic ear infections.

Dog ear infections are usually called Otits Externa; this means an infection in the outer ear. (Otis Interna means an infection of the inner ear). Outer ear infections account for 90% of the infections in dogs; making ear infection the most common infection for a dog to be treated for. Ear mites can often accompany ear infections.

Dogs with allergies may experience more ear infections than other dogs. It can be caused by wax build up inside the ear. It can also be caused by long hair blocking the passage of air and creating a buildup of not only wax but also dirt and debris.

Regular ear cleaning will also get the pet used to having his ears handled which will make it easier to administer treatment.

You can prevent these infections by cleaning your dogs ears well and as part of your regular grooming regime. Cleaning your dog's ears is simple and you only need a soft cloth and some ear cleanser. Lift the ears and massage some cleanser into the ear this should loosen the dirt.

Regualr ear cleaning is a powerful preventative measure; particularly if you have a dog who is at a high risk for ear infections. Ear infections are more common in dogs that swim often for example. Water inside the ears can be a problem for dogs who are essentially not designed for water.

You can spot an ear infection on your dog by looking for the following tell tale signs:

-smelly ears

-discharge

-excessive head shaking

-swelling

-redness in the ears

If your dog seems uncomfortable or is excessively scratching their ears it's probably causing a great deal of distress. If you pet is scratching too hard this can even break blood vessels and cause swelling and bleeding.

You can try cleaning your dogs ears with white vinegar to remove dirt from the ear and promote the growth of good bacteria. Use the vinegar in the same way as the ear cleanser - pour it on and wipe gently inside the ear with the cloth or cotton. This might help ease the infection or even clear it up if the problem was not too severe to start. If the infection is serious its time to call the vet. It can be cleared up easily. Most often the dog will need some antibiotics to help clear the problem.

If your dog has recurring ear infections the vet might suggest that you clip the hair around the ear or the vet might clip the hair around the ear. This often helps. If the problem is more extreme than that the vet might suggest surgery to allow for easier drainage of the ear canal.

Some breeds are more prone to chronic ear infections than others any breed of dog with large ears or particularly small ears will get ear infections easier than some other breeds. Now that you know what to look for you should be able to detect ear infections before they become a serious problem

Dog Grooming: Clipping the Nails

If the thought of clipping your dog's nails is frightening to you aren't alone. Most people prefer to ask their veterinarian to do this fiddly task. There's no reason why clipping your dogs nails should be a frightening task at all. There's no need to regard it as any different to giving your dog a bath.

Ideally you should start when your dog is young to get the dog used to having his feet handled regularly. Desensitizing your dog to having his paws handled will have a few other benefits too: it will make it easier for groomers or your vet to handle your dogs feet and will also mean if your dog is injured you will be able to examine his paws easier.

If it's your first time clipping a dogs nails it might be a good idea to watch someone else do it first. Ask your vet or the groomer if you can watch while they clip your dogs nails.

You will need a special pair of clippers for the purpose. Human clippers of scissors could tear the nail and cause painful torn edges. Make sure you get the right size and type of clippers for your dog. You might find a nail file useful too.

You will also want to have some special clotting powder on hand just in case you accidentally cut the nails too short and it starts bleeding. You can find all these products at your local pet supply store.

You will want to clip the nails in a quiet place with minimal distractions. If your dog has never had his nails clipped or is particularly resistant you might want to ask someone to help you. You are after all poking at your dog with a sharp object and it could be dangerous !

To avoid mishaps its best to slowly desensitize your dog to having his paws handled. this part should be easy. Take your dogs paws and massage them a bit.

It makes the process easier if the dogs nails are softer. You can do this by bathing the dog beforehand, massaging some baby oil into the paws or even just dipping the paw into warm water. This has the dual effect of both softening the paws and cleaning the dirt out from under the nails.

Examine the nails closely and try to locate the cluster of veins. This is called the 'quick' and cutting this can cause your dog to bleed. If your dog has dark nails this can be difficult. The best policy here is to trim the nails bit by bit over a longer period of time. The quick will retreat over time.

Try to cut with the right hand and hold the paw firmly. Use a calm soothing voice while you do this. You don't want your dog to become afraid and make the clipping more difficult. Try to cut at 90 degree angles.

If you do cut too far - don't worry! You can use some of the powder to stop the bleeding. Just sprinkle the powder over the affected area or dip the paw into the powder. There are some other household items you can use to slow the bleeding. You can use cornflower or normal powder in the same way you use the styptic powder. You can also press the dogs nail into some soap. If the bleeding is not too bad - just simply applying pressure should slow the bleeding.

If you have cut your dogs nails too far and they bleed - this may make the dog scared of the nail clipping all over again. You will need to desensitize your dog again.

If your dog is very afraid of having his nails clipped you should gradually get the dog used to the process and the tools. Start again by praising and treating the dog while you handle his paws. Then get the dog used to the clippers. Step by step desensitization coupled with positive reinforcement should ease your problem.

If you really can't get your dog to behave long enough for a nail clipping remember - most vets will do it for you. Don't be afraid to ask for help.

Dog Grooming – Maintaining A Posh Pup

Dog Grooming – It’s Not Just for Poodles Anymore

Dog grooming is not simply an aesthetic bonus for our canine friends. Maintaining a regular grooming schedule will help to keep your dog both happy and healthy. Routine dog grooming will ensure that your dog is free of parasites, has healthy skin and a shiny coat, and has good dental health. Of course, the aesthetic benefits are also a plus. Only a true dog lover wants to be around a dirty, stinky dog with bad breath. Proper dog grooming will bring out the best in man’s best friend.

What’s Involved in Dog Grooming?

While dog grooming can be performed at home, the best results can be achieved via a professional dog groomer. A thorough dog grooming session takes care of all the hygienic needs of your dog. The grooming process generally takes a hour or two to accomplish, but the results are well worth the time spent. A typical dog grooming session consists of the following treatments for your dog:

* A thorough bath including flea dip (if applicable)
* A complete coat brushing to eliminate tangles and matted hair
* Styling as requested (can include accessories such as bows, rhinestones and bandannas)
* Nail trimming
* Ear cleaning and examination for parasites
* Teeth cleaning

How Often Should Dog Grooming Take Place?

The frequency with which your should groom your dog is dependent on the breed and coat quality of your dog. Some breeds are considered high maintenance in terms of dog grooming, while others need only periodic care. Before you purchase or adopt a dog, it’s a good idea to find out how much grooming it will require. A basic guide to dog grooming by coat type is as follows:

* Curly-Coated – Dogs such as Poodles have a dense and curly coat that is fairly resistant to water. These dogs will require dog grooming at least once every two months, or six times a year.

* Short-Coated – Dogs with short dense coats, such as Corgis and Boxers need a weekly brushing, but do not need to be bathed more than once or twice a year unless a problem arises.

* Long-Coated – Long coated dogs, such as Collies and Sheepdogs, require a daily brushing to keep their coats in good condition. Additional dog grooming including regular bathing, should be administered once every other month.

* Silky-Coated – Afghans, Cocker Spaniels and Pekinese dogs belong to the silky coated dog group. These dogs require daily brushing and a thorough dog grooming session four times a year.

* Wire-Coated – Wire coated dogs require considerable dog grooming. Dogs such as Terriers and Schnauzers should be bathed every three months and have their coat clipped every six to eight weeks.

* Smooth-Coated – The smooth-coated class of dogs includes Labrador Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers and Dachshunds. These are very low maintenance dogs and require only weekly brushing and bathing as necessary.

Whatever type of dog you own, it’s important to see that proper grooming is maintained for the health and happiness of your canine companion.

Dog Grooming And Care

Brushing and combing your dog should be made into a pleasant ritual. Select a place to do the grooming-a chair, table or bench will be satisfactory. Lift the dog onto the chair or table, talking to him, reassuring him that all is well. Let him know that he's in for a treat, not an ordeal. Let him sniff each tool; the comb, brush, nail clippers and scissors. It's very important that he learn to associate these tools with a pleasant experience. Handle the situation with tact and care, and the pup will look forward to it. Botch the job and you will be looking for the pup the next time you bring out the grooming tools.

When brushing the puppy, stroke the brush with and against the lie of the hair. This will help to loosen dead hair and stimulate the skin. Use a brush with the correct bristle length; short for medium- and short-haired dogs, long bristles for long-haired dogs. If you do any combing, use a fine comb for the short-haired dog and a comb with widely spaced teeth for the long-haired, medium-haired and wirehaired dogs. You can bring out the gloss in your dog's coat by polishing with a flannel cloth or one of the commercial grooming gloves. These grooming gloves are available in pet shops or pet supply stores.

Matted hair

If you have a short- or smooth-haired dog, you will not have to worry about matted hair. But medium- and longhaired dogs do get tangled or matted hair from burs, paint, tar, chewing gum or other sticky or prickly objects. Dried food will also contribute to matted hair, and this is common in puppies and very old dogs. Matted hair is not only unsightly, but it can pinch and irritate the dog.

If the hair is not too snarled, try combing out the mats. Do this gently. Hold the matted hair or tuft in one hand and gently comb it. If it is too tightly matted, you will have to cut it off. Use blunt-end scissors. Puppies are very quick and wriggly, so be careful not to jab your pup with the scissors. There's very little danger with blunt-end scissors. Gently pull the mat away from the dog's body, then carefully cut the hair between the skin and the mat or tuft. Avoid pulling or yanking the tuft; it hurts. Tar, paint, and other sticky or gummy matter can be softened with acetone (nail-polish remover) and then combed out.










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